Programme

Thank you for your participation at IUW!

 

You can find the presented matierial here.

Programme for the IUW

09.00-10.00 - Check in Day 1

  • Welcome to IUW2021, International University Week 2021 in Odense, Denmark.
  • Welcome by Head of UCL Jens Mejer Pedersen
  • Social work in the context of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals.
  • Welcome by Head of Education, Social Work, Lenna Vogn Petersen

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer Anne-Sofie Hedengran Vedel ahve@ucl.dk
    Zoom link: Join here

 

10.00-10.15 - Short break

 

10.15-11.15 - Keynote 1:

  • Title: From global to local. Reflections on the UN's Sustainable Development Goals seen from a Danish island community.
  • Presented by: Politician, Deputy Mayor of Ærø and UCL student Inga Birgitte Blom Thomas.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer Anne-Sofie Hedengran Vedel ahve@ucl.dk
    Zoom link: Join here

 

11.15-11.30 - Short Break

 

11.30-11.45

  • Information about Peer to peer groups for all participants.

  • What is the activity: Peer-to-peer groups?
    This is a daily 15 minutes informal activity, where you meet students, lecturers and coordinators from different universities. You are placed into the same small group Monday and Tuesday and then in a new small group Wednesday and Thursday. Every peer-to-peer group has a Danish host.

  • Why?
    Normally when you participate in the international week, you physically meet other participants, when you are having breaks, eating lunch, moving from one location to another, etc.
    This moving around facilitates spontaneous interactions amongst the participants - BUT as we do not have these possibilities, we have arranged these short everyday meetings instead.
  • Content
    The Peer-to-Peer group activity is dialogue-based, so you can get to know a little bit about each other. Subjects for the dialogues could be: What has been of special interest to you? What are your international interest? What are your experiences with International cooperation?

  • Groups
    You can find your group under “Material”

Facilitated by UCL:
Lecturer Anna Sejer Nielsen, asni@ucl.dk
Zoom link: Join here

 

11.45-12.45 - Lunch break

 

12.45-14.15

  • Students Presentation
    • Students from each University do a presentation, max. 10 min. per University.
      Presentation of You, your country, city, campus etc. 

 

14.30-14.45 - Check out

Zoom link: Join here

09.00-09.15 - Check in Day 2

Zoom Link: Join here

 

09.15-09.30

  • Peer-to-Peer

Zoom Link: Join here

09.45-11.15

  • Keynote 2:

    From industrial to post-industrial society - Odense, Denmark and social policy.

    Senior Lecturer, Master of Science in Political Science, Ph.D. Jacob Christensen

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer Linda Sørensen, liso@ucl.dk
    Zoom Link: Join here

 

11.15-11.30 - Short Break

 

11.30-11.45

11.45-12.45 - Lunch break

 

12.45-14.15

  • Workshop 1: Reflecting Cultural Diversity in Social Work.

    Susanne Binder and Sabrina Steindl-Kopf. University: FH St. Pölten (Univiersity for Applied Science St. Pölten). And Students, Lisa Rosenbichler, Beate Binder and Jekaterina Mazek, Austria.

    SDG Nr. 10 “Reduce Inequalities” will be the focus of our online-workshop. Inequalities are often connected to diversity issues. Reflecting on diversity in Social Work is thus a basic requirement for an “equal” approach in social work settings. In particular we will point out the impact of contemporary and past flows of migration/flight that have shaped our societies in our workshop. We will also discuss the significance of cultural diversity in social work and reflect on key concepts, such as (cultural/ethnic) identity, intercultural competence, stigmatisation, empowerment, antidiscriminatory language. Last but not least we will review possibilities and challenges of diversity-competent consultation

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Student Cæcilie Burgdorf Christiansen, cbch23196@edu.ucl.dk
    Student Christine Mulungi Clausen, cmcl32402@edu.ucl.dk
    Zoom link: Join here

  • Workshop 2: Migration and Human rigths.

    Prof. Dr. Frederik von Harbou.
    University: Ernst-Abbe-University of Applied Sciences Jena,
    Jena, Germany.

    Migrants in Europe (understood in a broad sense as comprising both refugees and other migrants) are in a notoriously weak position when it comes to the risk of the violation of their human rights as well as to their opportunities to economic and social participation. Shaping a human rights sensitive European migration policy is one of today’s most pressing issues. It is also required by the UN's Sustainable Development Goals to reduce inequalities (Goal 10) and to strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development (Goal 17). The lecture will give an overview over some of the most pressing challenges to migrants’ human rights.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Student Cathrine Marie Berg, cmbe28286@edu.ucl.dk
    Student Charlotte Kvist Rasmussen, ckra28088@edu.ucl.dk

    Zoom link: Join here

  • Workshop 3: The house that you can visist if you need to talk

    To lower the threshold to access mental health care services for young people with various psychological difficulties, Overkop houses have been set up in Belgium. An Overkop house is a house to which young peopl have free access. They can enjoy several activites together or they can consult a clinician to ask for help or advice. An Overkop house is a safe place for vulnerable young people as nothing is mandatory and they will not be judged. If even psysically entering an Overkop house would be too difficult, you people can also chat with the employees via the website.
    The Overkop houses in Belgium are part of the integrated care system for young people and work together with various organisations within the broader health care sector (e.g. general practioneers, school counsellors).
    In our workshop, we will discuss the Overkop houses, but we will also have an interactive component by questioning the practices of the other participating countries.

    By teacher Gaëlle Hendrickx and students: Arne Saenen, Ayela Thierens, Kaat Van den Bossche. From Leuven, Belgium

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer Linda Sørensen, liso1@ucl.dk
    Zoom link: Join here

  • Workshop 4: By UCL Student Hamza Nazir

    This workshop will give you an insight into what negative social control is, how it occurs and how negative social control being a mental violence effects young people with minority ethnic backgrounds in Denmark.
    The workshop will also shed light on the methods and legal tools social workers use in Denmark and in other EU countries.
    At the same time, there will be a presentation of the organization EVOLVE and how professionals and volunteers in EVOLVE help to prevent social control and honor-related conflicts.
    There will also be a focus on the UN's sustainable development goals and how EVOLVE helps to process these goals.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer Anna Sejer Nielsen, asni1@ucl.dk
    Zoom link: Join here

 

18.00-20.00

  • Students Dinner - social dining

    All students are invited to join a small “virtual social dining evening”. The dinner groups will be mixed groups, so you will be together with 5 -7 students from different universities/countries.

    All you have to do is sit in front of your screen (computer, tablet, smartphone) with your dinner and join the conversation.

    We will help you by preparing examples of different topics, such as about daily life at your campus, about your country, what do you like to eat, etc.

    So please sign in for a nice, cozy social dining evening. We will have to find a host for every dinner party, the host will send you a zoom link for the party. We have some Danish students, who wants to be host, but we would like more hosts – so please give us a message, if you want to be host.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Cæcilie Burgdorf Christiansen, cbch23196@edu.ucl.dk
    Zoom link: Join here

 

18.00-20.00

  • Teachers Dinner

    Coordinators and teachers meet for “virtual social dining evening” in groups.

    Host Linda Sørensen and Heather Dawn Johannsen

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer Linda Sørensen, liso3@ucl.dk
    Zoom link: Join here

09.00-09.15 - Check in Day 3

Zoom Link: Join here

09.15-09.30

09.45-11.15

  • Workshop 5: Social work and social sustainability

    Prof. Dr. Michael Opielka. Ernst-Abbe-University of Applied Sciences Jena
    Jena, Germany

    For the first time in global politics the so-called “Agenda 2030” of the United Nations (UN) “Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)” bound together ecological and social goals for the future of mankind. The SDGs have been put in place in 2015 and since than all nations and all organizations with public impact had to deal with them. The International Federation of Social Workers IFSW e.g. published some documents on the question, how social work can support community building and social sustainability: See more here.
    In this workshop we will bring together different strands of social sustainability in social work and we discuss them in a multi-level-approach from local to regional to national to global perspectives. For the German speaking participants we recommend the book “Social Sustainability” by Prof. Opielka: Link to the book. An English paper will be prepared right in advance of the workshop.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer Linda Sørensen, Liso3@ucl.dk
    Zoom Link: Join here

  • Workshop 6: Why is gender important to remember? - How memory work can help to disclose suppressing structures in social practice.

    Assistant Lecturer Anja Bjørg Vinsten Christensen and Assistant Lecturer Rikke Sofie Wewer Jacobsen. UCL, Denmark.

    Dear students at the IUW who are attending the workshop Why is gender important to remember? - How memory work can help to disclose suppressing structures in social practice.

    Before the workshop we ask you to write half a page in English about a time in your life where you’ve experienced unfairness or a feeling of otherness because of gender norms. For example being told that there is something you had to do or could not do because of your gender, or feeling out of place because of your gender or even experiencing discrimination because of your gender. Consider how this experience and others like it have affected the way you see yourself and your possibilities in your life.


    Facilitated by UCL
    :
    Student Freja Ottosen, frot31533@edu.ucl.dk
    International Coordinator Heather Dawn Johannsen, hdjo@ucl.dk
    Zoom Link: Join here

  • Workshop 7: CMM, a communication theory focusing on creating equality and inclusive social worlds

    Jacob Cilius Vinsten Christiansen, Senior Lecturer, Master of Family Therapy and Systemic Practice.
    UCL, Denmark.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer Anna Sejer Nielsen, asni1@ucl.dk
    Zoom Link: Join here

  • Workshop 8: Abstract: Social Work in the context of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals: opportunities and challenges!

    PXL University College of Applied Sciences and Arts is the first Flemisch educational institution to receive the UN sustainability certificiate “SDG Pioneer” on 1st of February 2021!

    In this workshop we would like to focus on how sustainable development is reflected in our daily life as a student of Social Work at PXL University College of Applied Sciences and Arts!

    PXL, Hasselt, Belgium.

    Teacher:
    Ivette Leten

    Students:        
    Dilara Aytar
    Amber Budeners
    Lennie Heleven
    Amelie Massart
    Salvatore Mostien

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Student, Christine Mulungi Clausen, cmcl32402@edu.ucl.dk
    International Coordinator Heather Dawn Johannsen, hdjo@ucl.dk
    Zoom Link: Join here

  • Workshop 9: Social work with refugess

    How buddies can help: For several years now, Europe has been dealing with a rather big migration flow. Most of them are immigrants from non-European countries coming to the EU. Originating from a different culture, integrating into a new society can be difficult, both for the person and society. Especially refugees can have a hard time adapting. To help these refugees find their way in a new environment, some European countries have set up a buddy-program. This Workshop will give an insigts into how different organizations in various European countries support refugees with their integration through the buddy-program.

    Teacher Gaëlle Hendrickx Leuven and students Amy Engels, Melissa Govaerts Alyssa Vollon from Leuven, Belgium

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Student Cathrine Marie Berg, cmbe28286@edu.ucl.dk 
    Student Charlotte Kvist Rasmussen, ckra28088@edu.ucl.dk
    Zoom Link: Join here

11.15-11.30 - Short Break

11.30-11.45

11.45-12.45 - Lunch break

12.45-14.15

  • Field visit 1 - Inequality in Health

    Presented by: Rikke Sofie Wewer Jakobsen.

    In this field visit we explore how the Danish healthcare system embrace some of the most vulnerable people in Denmark, people with massive drug and alcohol abuse living in the streets of Odense. First you’ll see a video where we meet trauma nurse Dorthe Wewer and social nurse Sara Harrild who are working intensely on helping this group. We also meet Tue Nielsen, leader of a local shelter in Odense. Tue has a close daily contact with these people and a deep insight into the groups problems and also the solutions that already exist for helping them.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Anna Sejer Nielsen, asni1@ucl.dk
    Zoom link: Join here

  • Field visit 2: Vollsmose – Thomas Skov

    SDG 11 - Sustainable Cities and Communities (Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities)

    Virtual visit to the Vollsmose and take a guided tour of the neighbourhood. Vollsmose is a living area, where there are living people from many different countries. Some politicans thinks it is a ghetto area because the rate of unemployment are rather high and there are other social problems in the area.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer Linda Sørensen, liso3@ucl.dk
    Zoom link: Join here

  • Field visit 3: From a Danish bureaucrat to a fiery soul – meet a social worker from two different fields
    “Congratulations newly-graduated social workers! Go change the world!”. The moment you receive your diploma, you are already picturing yourself saving the world. Well… reality is something else. Reality is laws. Reality is bureaucracy. Reality is living up to the expectations of the leaders and politicians. Reality is numbers. Reality is benchmarking.
    Working in a job center has a lot of stigmas in Denmark. Have you ever talked to someone from the field?
    Are you interested in understanding how social work in a job center differs from voluntary social work?
    Does anything that I mentioned intrigue you? If so, I’ll see you on the 21st of April.Social worker Javeenan Jeyasothinayagam

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer Anne-Sofie Hedengran Vedel, ahve@ucl.dk
    Zoomlink: Join here

  • Field visit 4: St. Dannesbo - Socialworker Karin Thrane

    Sustainable development goal 2 – Zero Hunger (end hunger and ensure access by all people to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round, decrease food waste, encourage sustainable food choices)

    Virtual visit to. St. Dannesbo Care Home for vulnerable people (they cultivate organic vegetables and , have focus on nutritious meals).

    Social worker Karin Thrane will tell you about her work and how they work in this care homewith food and good meals.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    International Coordinator Heather Dawn Johannsen, hdjo@ucl.dk
    Zoom link: Join here

14.15-14.30 Short Break

 

14.30-14.45 Check out

Facilitated by UCL: Lecturer Anne-Sofie Hedengran Vedel, ahve@ucl.dk
Zoom link: Join here

 

20.00-22.00 - Online party: Zoom Link

  • Social talk - Facilitated by UCL:
  • Students will plan - Facilitated by UCL
  • Students will plan - Facilitated by UCL:

09.00-09.15 - Check in Day 4

Zoom link: Join here

09.15-09.30

9.45-11.15

  • Workshop 10: Inequalities, racism and social work.

    GOAL 10: Reduced inequalities.

    Xavier Casademont Falagura. University of Girona, Spain.

    This workshop will contribute to the reflection on the 10th goal: reducing inequalities. Racism and integration of minorities are hot topics in many countries. Even though many European countries have had experiences of migration flows throughout its history, sadly there are still many examples of discrimination and racism. During the last decades, many European parliaments have seen the growing power of far-right parties, which with anti-immigrant discourses have gained support from people upset with the consequences of the globalization, the negative effects of economic crisis and the retrenchment of the Welfare State. Social workers play a crucial role in tackling inequalities and fighting towards racism. However, are social workers immune to racism? How can they promote better inclusion of immigration? In this workshop, we will discuss the importance of racism and discrimination to all forms of diversity, as well as suggesting strategies to foster positive attitudes to diversity and immigration.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Student, Christine Mulungi Clausen, cmcl32402@edu.ucl.dk 
    Student, Cathrine Marie Berg, cmbe28286@edu.ucl.dk
    Student Charlotte Kvist Rasmussen, ckra28088@edu.ucl.dk
    Zoom Link: Join here

  • Workshop 11: Digitalization from an intersectional perspective and its implications for Social Work.

    Assistant professor for psycho-social competence Kathrin Bereiter and Assistant professor for psycho-social competence Helene Kletzl. University of Applied Sciences Linz, Austria

    Digital Transformation Processes concern almost every part of social and human life. Their effects might relate most directly towards clients of Social Work, as they might most likely be effected by ADM (automated decision making) or the planning and implementation of (partly) digital Social Services. Now it is on the people in charge to provide the ADM-algorithms with data they learn from or base their decision at, which is why Artificial Intelligence can reproduce existing bias and lead to severe discrimination.

    The theory of Intersectionality is used to analyse and understand how social categories such as race*, class, gender, disability, sexuality, etc. creates inequality and discrimination. It is about discovering interlocking systems of oppression.

    Digitalization processes might become such systems of oppression – or they might contribute to an inclusive society. In this workshop we will have a close look at the theoretical framework of intersectionality and on how Digitalization allude to Social Work as a profession. Ensuring we will discus how an intersectional perspective could help reducing discrimination by digitization processes.

    With regard to the UN’s sustainable development goals the inclusive (or exclusive) design of digitalization processes will have crucial effects on education, gender equality as well as peace an justice and strong institutions.

    We will use participatory methods like working in groups and pairs, therefore the participants of this workshop are asked to bring in their expertise in order to develop the vision of an inclusive digital society.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer, Linda Sørensen, liso@ucl.dk
    Zoom link: Join here

  • Workshop 12

    Presented by: Assoc. Prof. MA et M.S. Jitka Vacková & Doctor and pH.D Lesiu Shuranovou, University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice, The Czech Republic.

    European largest minority: Roma people
    1. History, tradition, habits, country of origin. Roma people as the children of the wind.
    2. Specifics of Roma way of life.
    3. Roma identity and identity of majority population.
    4. Integration of Roma people. Examples from the Czech Republic and other states.

    Summary:
    The most well-known and most widely-held opinion about the origin of the Roma was that they originated in „Little Egypt“, from where they came to the Christian lands. In the Balkans, the Roma were named by a term originally given to a sect of Macedonian monks, the Athiganoi or Atsiganos, from which came another group of names – Zingaro (Italy), Tsigane (France), Zigeuner (Germany), Cigani (Slovak Rep.), Cikáni (Czech Rep.).

    Lectures and seminars will include information about historic aspect of Roma way of life, including description of Roma identity in 21. Century. The last topic will include different discussion concerning integration of Roma in the Czech Republic and other European States with impact to Sustainable Development Goals defined by United Nations and implication to social work practice.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer Anne-Sofie Hedengran Vedel, ahve@ucl.dk
    Zoom Link: Join here

  • Field visit 5: Danmarks Forsorgsmuseum

    The Danish Welfare Museum, Svendborg.

    UN – goal no. 1 No Poverty and goal no. 2 zero Hunger
    We are visiting the former poor- and workhouse in Svendborg.
    Thereafter we will do casework, based on authentical historical cases from Svendborg Poor- and workhouse.

    Facilitated by UCL:
    Lecturer Anna Sejer Nielsen, asni1@ucl.dk
    Student Hamza Nazir, hana31733@edu.ucl.dk
    Student Inga Birgitte Blom Thomas, ibbt12016@edu.ucl.dk
    Zoom link: Join here

11.15-11.30 - Short break

11.30-11.45

11.45-12.45 - Thank you and Goodbye